Pedophile Rings Hiding in Plain Sight

It’s been scarcely a month since the findings about Penn State’s transgressions pertaining to convicted pedophile Jerry Sandusky were revealed in their harrowing detail. That the former assistant coach of the Nittany Lions football program was convicted on 45 of 48 counts and likely will never have a life outside of prison may have mollified the majority of observers sickened by the ordeal and, perhaps, ready to move on.

But it might not yet be time to turn the page on Sandusky. Reports have been surfacing that the ex-coach and founder of the dubious youth-oriented charity Second Mile may well have been part of a broad ring of pedophiles. Indeed, if reports are true the ring may have included wealthy and/or well-connected men who are otherwise highly regarded in business, politics and other professions.

Last November journalist Victor Thorn wrote a piece for American Free Press headlined “The Far-reaching Implications of the PSU Child-abuse Scandal.” The story addressed the likelihood of a Pennsylvania-based pedophile ring.

On July 22 Thorn was back interviewing Greg Bucceroni, a police officer working for Philadelphia schools. Bucceroni, who also volunteers for the Philadelphia district attorney’s office, is quoted by Thorn recalling:
“In 1979 and 1980—when I was 13 and 14 years old—a well-connected pedophile named Edward Savitz took me on trips from Philadelphia to TSM fundraisers. I knew the minute I got there it was a breeding ground because of Savitz’s involvement. While [Jerry] Sandusky interacted with wealthy donors, the other men were sizing-up kids. I felt like a cheap whore because I was in these naked pictures that Savitz was passing around.”
When Thorn asked Bucceroni how certain he is about his recollections, the police officer replied: “I’m sure of it. Savitz talked about taking kids from Philly to TSM and introducing them to men—soliciting them to ‘his friends.’ They exchanged and swapped kids like baseball cards. It was a feeding frenzy. I felt like a prostitute or a go-go dancer at a bachelor party. I felt dirty, used and cheap.”

Savitz had been the subject of a sordid 1992 Time magazine story , part of which reads:
“To the teenage boys who visited his apartment near Philadelphia’s Rittenhouse Square, Ed Savitz was an easy client who paid $15 for oral sex and had a fetish for soiled underwear and socks. Health and law-enforcement officials fear that Savitz was also a walking AIDS time bomb. The 50-year-old actuary, who was arrested and charged with sexual abuse of children last month, has admitted that he has had AIDS for one year.”
Savitz succumbed to AIDS a year after the Time article.

New pedophile-ring information is bound to continue surfacing in the wake of the Sandusky convictions. Alleged victims such as Bucceroni will feel emboldened to reveal their painful recollections. In this way, not only will many victims be able to help ease their own emotional burdens. They’ll also help reveal and bring to justice what could be hundreds, perhaps thousands of pedophiles hiding in plain sight behind their public facades of upright character.

For further reading you can visit the Huffington Post.

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